Aloha Moments by Graham Ezzy from Graham Ezzy on Vimeo.

Maybe it's a big statement, maybe not. Maybe it detracts us from the whole video, maybe not. However you see it this latest web offering that Graham Ezzy has provided us shows not just high quality action and high quality editing but it also highlights one of the best moves ever witnessed in wave riding competition, the one handed taka.

I learned how to compete in the 2014 Aloha. Competition windsurfing is a mind game.

Albeit don't let this one mind blowing move distract you from the rest of this epic clip but if it caught your attention as much as it did ours then be sure to read our interview with the man himself by simply scrolling right.

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BS: You've released this clip about some of your finest moments during the PWA Aloha Classic, can you tell us what made this event so important to you?

Ezzy: I learned how to compete in the 2014 Aloha. Competition windsurfing is a mind game. Up till now, I was hit or miss. But in this Aloha, I sailed a ton of heats and gained a little more wisdom with each. I competed against many of my heroes--like Levi and Polakow--which took away some of my nervousness because I didn't care if I lost. And when I beat them, I gained confidence. Coming out of that event, I have loads more contest knowledge and a bit more confidence.

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BS: There was no doubt that this one handed taka you threw down in the expression session was quite likely the best one we've ever seen in competition. Can you tell us a bit about that actual moment and how it was to win the expression session ahead of so many top names?

The goal was to crash on every wave by trying something new. I fell on every wave and had my most fun session of the year

Ezzy: That 1-handed taka is the only 1-handed carving taka done in competition! It's a scary move because in the middle, you're sliding down the wave backwards with no control of the sail. Most of the time, I crash. In fact, during that taka, I didn't know that I made it until after I'd made it. I thought for sure that I was falling. That made the landing so much sweeter! I couldn't help but claim it.

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BS: The video you have released is a quality masterpiece, is it producing clips like this that inspire you to keep pushing hard with windsurfing or is it a number of attributes that keep you motivated?

Ezzy: Thank you. Motivation is funny. A couple weeks ago, back on Maui after a winter of training Port tack, I was completely unmotivated. I was sailing good but was not filming, not photoshooting, and not training for the upcoming European competitions. I felt like I was wasting my time. This made me sad because windsurfing should be fun for the sake of windsurfing. I got out of my funk by going out for a session with the intention of landing nothing. The goal was to crash on every wave by trying something new. I fell on every wave and had my most fun session of the year. But yes, I love making little windsurfing films. Each film keeps the sailing alive for a little longer. I wish I were enlightened enough to go out and rip and not care at all--like Buddhist monks making sand mandalas. But in fact, I care very much. Passion for windsurfing consumes meā€¦and I guess a certain egotism.

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BS: Looking ahead, what are your plans for this year and where do you want to finish on the PWA World Tour?

Ezzy: This year is for the PWA. Next year too. I could stay at Hookipa my whole life, but that's boring. Competition and European sailing are a big challenge for me; and, that's motivating. Where do I want to finish? Of course I want to do well, but I'm not obsessing about a certain position. I want to finish better. That's it.