Before the PWA section of the JP Aloha Classic the AWT riders took centre stage. It was incredible to see so many talented American and other riders, many of which call Ho'okipa home, performing at such a high level on an uncrowded Ho'okipa break.

But, it was these four Quatro riders that made it all the way to the final:

Bernd Roediger, Levi Siver, Keith Teboul and Camille Juban.

Boardseeker catches up with Keith Teboul to find out more about each of the finalists and the boards they use. Just what makes each of these boards work, for each rider?

The final four of the AWT in Maui, but how are their boards developed?

Interview and images by Simon Crowther.

Bernd and Camille both like shorter boards, because they're smaller. I'm not going to say they're more progressive than Levi's board, but younger, more hip-hop you know?

SC: Congratulations on such a great team result at the AWT, you must be stoked to have all four riders in the final!

KT: Yeah, I'm super happy with the team performance, it was a great result.

SC: Who was on production and who was on custom boards for the competition?

KT: That's a good question. Bernd was riding his production board during his heats. Camille was on a small production board too (the Sphere), when conditions were right, though Camille's main board was a custom.

All the R&D that I've been doing goes into the custom boards, and then on into the production ranges, so everything in the custom boards goes into our production boards, too. So, they are all sailing either current or future production boards.

Levi's backup board was a production board (Pyramid Thruster), he never had to use it, but that's what he had on the beach waiting for him.

SC: How do the boards used by each of the AWT finalists differ?

KT: Bernd and Camille both like shorter boards, because they're smaller, I'm not going to say more progressive than Levi's board, but more young, hip-hop you know? They are looking for different things.

The 74 that Bernd was using has a single to double concave with a vee off the tail, as does Camille's. Levi's board however has a single to double full concave right through the board to the tail, this helps Levi really drive at finishing his turns more, and in general. Levi's board is designed around him being bigger than Camillle and Bernd. Levi needs more volume, so his boards come in at around 82-84, Camille is riding around 70-72, Bernd actually likes a little bit more volume and width than Camille and is riding a 74.

With Levi it has been a steady development, over the years we've been working together, to shape his boards.

[part title="What about the development of the boards?"]

SC: What about the development of the boards?

KT: All the boards are based upon the same principles, I just tend to change the bottom contours a little bit. Rockers are generally kept the same, and that's also what I ride too. The boards are generally based on what I'm riding.

With Levi it has been a steady development, over the years we've been working together, to shape his boards. With myself, I'm always trying new stuff with my boards, so I can bring new ideas to all the boards we do. Bernd kinda gets the best of both worlds; whether it's the production board, which really suits his needs, or its his custom board.

SC: So, all the boards have a similar starting point?

KT: Yes, they kind of do. So I have the models, which I start from. The pyramid, for instance, which has a squashed tail, a little bit wider towards the back and then pulled in at the tail; the last design of that board is the starting point for the new board.

Then I have Levi's 'go to' board that's been steadily evolving. When I make a new board for him, I plug off of that last board and make the new changes. It's then the same for myself, I just go from the last board that I made for me, and go from there. Camille usually takes what shape I'm riding, but just a little tuned to suit his needs.

My last board is frickin' amazing, it's the best board I've ever had! It's the closest to a surf board that I've ever felt, the way it projects through turns.

SC: Do the riders come to you with input of what they want, for example what if Bernd felt he wanted something different?

KT: Oh, yeah, definitely.

Bernd likes a little bit more pop in his boards, a little wider outline and a little more forgiving with wider tails. I make stand up boards for Bernd too, with similar wider outlines, he really knows how to throw around wider boards, it really suits his rotational moves.

Bernd is now really coming into his power, he's pretty powerful for his size, and I think he is going to come into a lot more power. I think that's when it's going to get more interesting. I'm looking forward to designing some stuff to really accentuate his power, I mean don't get me wrong hes got good power now, but he's got really good flow through the whole wave and I think there's more power to come. So I'm looking forward to tuning to his needs, before I would feed Bernd more or less what I ride, and I think he's really starting to figure his own needs out now. I really think he's going to start coming to me with more of his own ideas.

I think the overall goal, no matter what the board, has been to get the boards faster and faster, but still be able to deliver that turn.

[part title="Who's board has progressed the most?"]

SC: Who's board has progressed the most?

KT: It's actually my board, I'm always trying stuff whether it's going to work or not, that's the R&D right there.

My last board is frickin' amazing, it's the best board I've ever had! It's the closest to a surf board that I've ever felt, the way it projects through turns.

All that type of development goes into Levi's board, with Levi he is a little bit more particular about change, and so sometimes I'll sneak some things in. In fact twice now he's ridden boards where he wasn't super stoked at first, I took the board and adjusted some things, and I sailed it, I went back and said 'Dude, you need to retry this board' and he's gotten on with it and that was the board he won on. So, Levi is starting to open his mind and I'm starting to feed him some new stuff to get a new feeling for him, it's really showing and I'm stoked to see it in his sailing.

What I learn and about my boards I put into his and I'm seeing it in his sailing, that's exciting.

SC: Has there ever been any surprises from a new shape?

KT: I'm not sure about surprises, with this last board there was a hope that I would see something in Levi's riding, and I see it; it's a quicker turn off the top, a projection off the lip and a consistency of movement. Levi's sailing was so consistent in the competition so I knew that it had worked, and I already feel like I have some more things I want to throw at him, cos it's really just going to get better.

It's the same with Bernd, it's the same with everyone, though I've worked more closely with Levi for the longest time, so that's where I really see the change. Bernd is responding well, I see it in him too. With Camille, I'm really looking forward to making him some new boards, I want to get him feeling what I'm feeling from the new changes.

[part title="So, you R&D new ideas, feed those new ideas into the riders boards, and from those boards the changes feed into the production boards?"]

SC: So, you R&D new ideas, feed those new ideas into the riders boards, and from those boards the changes feed into the production boards?

KT: Exactly, everything I do is translated through to production; whether it's into a side onshore wave board or a pure sideshore/down-the-line wave board. I think the overall goal, no matter what the board, has been to get the boards faster and faster, but still be able to deliver that turn. I make sure I get the best of what I'm finding, into each category of board

SC: Do you think this development produces a board suited to just advanced wavesailors or are they easy to use for every level?

KT: You know when the shapes are really easy to use that people are going to get on them and be super excited because of what they are feeling from the performance of the boards. The boards we produce are easy and fast, I'm not making boards that are too specific to people's riding now, we are doing something different all the time on the wave - long drawn out turns, shorter snappy turns - so the boards need to be kind of neutral to suit different styles.

There's always little things I do to accentuate the shapes for certain riders but it's more about moving or changing the volume, and our team riders want a board that can do front foot and back foot, so the shapes stay neutral for that. I think that really translates for people coming off other boards. If a board is neutral, it makes it easier for a rider to be more aggressive and really attack the wave, whether the wave is perfectly walling or has bumpy peaky sections, and it's a board's ability to keep you going that really makes it work.

Check out more about Quatro on Boardseeker here and head to their own website for more detail here.