Brawzinho's storm chase set up...

How do you make a sail that survives the ultimate storm?

Boardseeker takes a closer look at the design and features of some of the sails used during the storm chase, to figure out just what makes them, almost, indestructible.

First up Brawzinho's Banzais...

Click the numbers below for all info and Boardseeker insight.

[part title="Titanium"]

Marcilio Browne. Image credit Red Bull Content Pool
Titanium

Goya say:

Titanium

MAXIMUM STRENGTH

ON POLY CLEW RINGS

When we decided to add rings to our outhaul system instead of puncturing holes into our sails using grommets or eyelets or rivets that hold plastic apparatusses, we also opted to go for the best available material. Titanium. No rust, no bending, no compromise.

Boardseeker say:

No more outhaul blow outs with the addition of these titanium rings. A outhaul blow out used to be fairly common, but now with the ring being added there's no compromising the sail itself.

[part title="Carbon"]

Carbon

Goya say:

Carbon

PERFECT STIFFNESS

ON STRETCH CONTROL

Carbon in being used to ensure maximum stiffness for the Stretch Control System resulting in greatly improved articulation of the concept over standard materials.

Boardseeker say:

Carbon fibre is widely used, strong, reliable. It's a must have.

[part title="Kevlar"]

Goya say:

Kevlar

ULTIMATE RESISTANCE

ON REINFORCEMENTS

Kevlar can be found in our scrim reinforcement yarn, all along the sleeve panel, as well as in the anti-chafe sleeve top, that is the front-most part of the black shape in the top of the sail, notorious to be in touch with asphalt, rocks, sand as well as your hands, so we thought it might be nice if it still felt and looked good after your session.

Boardseeker say:

Kevlar was originally designed as a replacement for steel in racing tyres, it is now used even used in body armour and is five times stronger than steel (weight for weight). That makes it pretty damn strong in our book.

[part title="Nylon"]

Goya say:

Nylon

ULTRA DURABLE. UNBREAKABLE.

ON WEBBINGS AND MINI BATTENS

Nylon is being used on parts and pieces of the sail that either see a lot of abuse or need to remain intact at all cost even if the rest of the sail is coming apart in the white water. This includes the core webbings that hold the structure of the sail in place.

Boardseeker say:

Brawzi's sails took a pounding in the white water, this nylon would have really helped keep things together as the sail took the fifth wave of the set!

[part title="7 Mil Monofilm"]

Monofilm

Goya say:

7 Mil Monofilm

WHEN IT BREAKS YOU ACTUALLY WANT IT TO

ON ALL MONOFILM WINDOWS

Yes, we are using Monofilm in our windows, but the foil used is a 7 mil material that is almost double the thickness of most other foils in the industry, making it quite bulletproof. When it does break you actually want it to because otherwise you would most likely get hurt. For the chart, this foil is more puncture resistant than 5 mil X-Ply.

Boardseeker say:

Double the thickness of other foils you say? We hope this means double the strength too!

[part title="Double Stitching"]

Double stitching

Goya say:

Double Stitching

HIGH LOAD AREA REINFORCEMENT

ON ALL PRODUCTS

Double stitching to all batten pockets and material transitions with overlapping tape to reduce any ridge formation for longevity and cleaner airflow. Makes for massively durable, reliable and bombproof seam construction.

Boardseeker say:

Bomb proof panelling is what you need for a good storm, and you need each of your sail panels to be held together tightly. Goya's double stitching does just this.